About

21. Cuchulain and the Rivers

By Anonymous
Translated by Joseph Dunn1914

Now while the hosts proceeded from Ath Firdead (‘Fer diad’s Ford’) southwards, Cuchulain lay in his sickbed in that place. Then came certain men of the Ulstermen thither to help and succour Cuchulain. Before all, Senoll Uathach and the two sons of Gegè: Muridach and Cotreb, to wit. And they bore him to the streams and rivers of Conalle Murthemni, to rub and to wash his stabs and his cuts, his sores and his many wounds in the face of these streams and rivers. For the Tuatha De Danann (‘the Tribes divine of Danu’) were wont to put herbs and plants of healing and a curing charm in the waters and rivers of the territory of Conalle Murthemni, to help and to succour Cuchulain, so that the streams were speckled and green-topped therewith.

Accordingly these are the names of the healing rivers of Cuchulain:—

Sas, Buan, Buas, Bithslan, Findglas (‘Whitewater’), Gleoir, Glenamain, Bedg, Tadg, Telameit, Rind, Bir, Brenidè, Dichaem, Muach, Miliuc, Cumung, Cuilind, Gainemain, Drong, Delt, Dubglas (‘Blackwater’).

Then was the grave of Ferdiad dug by the men of Erin and his funeral games were held.

Táin Bó Cúailnge
By Anonymous
English translation by Joseph Dunn (1914)
Cover: Táin Bó Cúailnge trans. Joseph Dunn (1914)